The Ringalina Doll Head

Now, let's finally get some hands-on experience!

Right now you have to make the decision if you would like to make a 17"-18" tall doll or a 15"-16" tall doll. The taller one has a head circumference of about 13"-14" and the shorter one about 11"-12". We will be rolling a wool ball, shape the head and a basic sculpting of the face.

We will be rolling a wool ball, shape the head and a basic sculpting of the face.

Please, note that we roll a ball of 2" larger than the head circumference we want to end up with. So at least 15" for the taller or 13" for the shorter Ringalina Doll. Rather opt on the larger side, unless you are a tight wool roller.

We created a ball that we turned into "the brain" for our doll. Now we will continue and cover it with layers upon layers of wool and adding tube gauze to shape it.

You will need the following stitches:
-double wrap-knot
-the basic whip stitch

We completed the shaping of the head and are now ready to sculpt. This part is one of my favorite parts in doll making, as this is the moment when (I believe) my doll will receive his or her character.

You will need to know the following stitches:
-cross stitch in place
-ladder/invisible stitch

The eye string like the equator between "north" and "south" pole (top of head and neck). Please be sure it is centered, don't let the grain of the fabric trick you.


rolled to circumference of 14 inches


14" circumference shrunk down to 12"



after layers and tube gauze are added

eye-string

pinning to mark ears



ear mark - cross stitching

lowering eye-string in the back

hiding string with invisible stitch



frontal of basic head

The eye-string runs like the equator between "north" and "south" pole (top of head and neck). Please be sure it is centered, don't let the grain of the fabric trick you. I am posting a frontal view and a side view here, because that isn't shown long enough in the video.

Thanks to Nancy who pointed out that the video isn't clear enough I am adding some pictures below. 

The eye-string runs like the equator between "north" and "south" pole (top of head and neck). Please be sure it is centered, don't let the grain of the fabric trick you. I am posting a frontal view (first image) and a side view (second image)  here, because that isn't shown long enough in the video. The side view shows also where the cross stitch in place secures the eye-string very well.

You are at the point where you created the basic head for your Waldorf doll and have options.... You can now add skin fabric for the basic doll, add another tie to increase the sculpting, or even adding needle felted features. Take a look at the videos coming up before you make your final decision. 

We will be using all of the stitches:
-the running/basting stitch
-the back-stitch
-the whipstitch
-the ladder/invisible stitch.


Added chin thread

The cheeks are added by adding another string, which gets pulled through the head from ear to ear, under the chin and back to the ear. Repeat and pull tight 5-7 times. Below you see 2 close up pictures of the added cheeks

Frontal View

side needle felted face

frontal needle felted face


view from above of felted face

Below I am showing the needle felted face where the eyes will be embroidered. The lips are felted and a red beeswax crayon is used after the skin fabric is added to color them a little. I am still new to adding needle felted lips, but thought I'd show how it could be done.

frontal felted face with lips

side view of felted face with lips

particular doll that goes with the images of felted face



If you purchased the pattern to make a Ringalina Doll please start watching the video at 2:05 minutes. The beginning of the video explains how to create a head pattern for any size doll. If you haven't already, below you can purchase the pattern needed. The instant download includes head, torso, legs, and arm pattern in 2 sizes (13-14 inches and 17-18 inches).

Ringalina Doll Pattern

Ringalina Doll Pattern

$ 10.00
This pattern can be used in combination with the Ringalina Doll Course. I have been using this pattern for over 30 years and adjust it depending on what I feel
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